Lucky noodles, whole fish and rice cake recipes for Year of the Ox

For the Fang family of San Francisco, navigating the week-long Chinese New Year is typically a dizzying experience.

Between their two restaurants, Chinatown’s historic House of Nanking, owned by Peter and Lily Fang, and SoMa’s modern Fang restaurant, from chef-owner daughter Kathy, the Fangs usually get home from service and their own Chinese New Year’s eve celebration at 2 a.m., their feet sore and bellies full with fish, dumplings, noodles and other lucky foods eaten for the holiday.

This year, of course, will be different. For the first time, instead of hosting a big dinner party with extended family,

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Meet the American who spent a year eating his way through Singapore

No one wants to be stuck in a foreign country during a global pandemic.



a man and a woman taking a selfie: American software engineer Jon Lu has eaten at Michelin-starred Odette, helmed by chef Julien Royer, four times.


© Jon Lu
American software engineer Jon Lu has eaten at Michelin-starred Odette, helmed by chef Julien Royer, four times.

But, by his own admission, 25-year-old Jon Lu, an American software engineer, chose to remain in Singapore when the world’s borders began to shutter last year.

“I arrived in Singapore for the first time in August 2019, although my time was mostly spent abroad for work,” says the New York native. “I didn’t start truly living in Singapore until March 2020.”

The Massachusetts Institute of

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I’ve pledged to eat only British food for a year, but will I succeed?

For most of us, 2021 will be the Year of the Vaccine, and dare we hope, the Year of the Hug, too. For me, it will also be the Year of Eating British.

As someone who has spent their professional life sampling and writing about food, and who loves a fragrant mango or the scent of star anise as much as the next person, why am I choosing to limit my palate to the contents of Britain’s larder?

It’s certainly not for flag-waving nationalistic reasons. But this pandemic has made me think – hard. The empty supermarket shelves at

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The Year We Spent Making, Baking, Frying And Trying : NPR

A character puts (or takes out) some cookies in (from) the oven, which is shaped like a house to represent the time we're spending at home during the pandemic.
A character puts (or takes out) some cookies in (from) the oven, which is shaped like a house to represent the time we're spending at home during the pandemic.

Renee Horton has spent a lot more time than usual in her kitchen this year.

Horton, a NASA engineer from New Orleans, has been working from home almost exclusively since March. With her desk just steps away from her home’s kitchen, she often tries out new vegan recipes and also makes her classic comfort food staples in between video meetings.

For Horton, cooking during the coronavirus pandemic has meant consistency at a time when everything has changed.

“I think I ate chicken and waffles at the beginning because that was, like, my true comfort food,” Horton tells NPR.

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